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Visitas guiadas ao Centro Ismaili

Guided Tours

Centro Ismaili

How to get there?

16 Dec - 2017

14h, 14h30, 15h

Centro Ismaili

How to get there?

16 Dec - 2017

14h, 14h30, 15h

Avenida Lusíada, 1
Metro: Laranjeiras (linha azul)
Carris: 701, 726, 764

Máximo de 25 participantes por sessão;
inscrições a partir de 4 de dezembro,
para os contactos: 21 722 90 41 (9h30 às 13h e
14h30 às 19h)/nationalcouncil@cism.com.pt

In the heart of the Laranjeiras neighbourhood, amongst criss-crossing express roads and buildings which reach up to the sky, there’s a hidden oasis: the Lisbon Ismaili Centre, a space that, almost 20 years ago opened its doors to the Ismaili Muslim community and whoever else wants to visit, though it remains unknown to many Lisbon natives. It consists of a building divided into three distinct areas (one institutional, one religious and the other social) whose architectural design was inspired by the philosophy and traditions of Islamic countries, combined with those of the Iberian Peninsula. The centre brings together three styles and architectural influences representing different regions and historical periods: traditional Portuguese heritage (manifested in its stone construction), Islamic ideals (through a constant use of geometry) and the Andalusian style marked by cloisters, courtyards and lush interior gardens.

Those interested in discovering this remarkable building can do so via guided tours (subject to booking) and a Lisbon Christmas concert which is especially fitting for the venue: the performance of the work of Eduardo Paniagua, a Spanish architect and musician specialising in medieval music. It must be remembered that the medieval life and culture of the Iberian Peninsula was very different from the situation in other European countries during the same period, given the crucial influence of the Islamic world, of the Hebrews and the Sephardim on artistic expression.
Hispanic Muslim music is an example of this cultural symbiosis, the result of a mixture of Muslim and Christian ingredients that bubbled away in the Andalusian cauldron for more than seven centuries. Arabic-Andalusian music is a musical treasure that has survived down to the present day and its preservation, its study and recovery is a gift to Western musical heritage.